// by Arthur Eddington | Philosophy Department at St. Anselm College //

It is impossible to trap modern physics into predicting anything with perfect determinism because it deals with probabilities from the outset.

It would probably be wiser to nail up over the door of the new quantum theory a notice, 'Structural alterations in progress--No admittance except on business', and particularly to warn the doorkeeper to keep out prying philosophers.

It is in the external world that the four dimensions are united -- not the relations of the external world to the individual which constitute his direct acquaintance with space and time.

Schrodinger's wave-mechanics is not a physical theory, but a dodge -- and a very good dodge too.

Schrodinger's theory is now enjoying the full tide of popularity, partly because of intrinsic merit, but also, I suspect, partly because it is the only one of the three that is simple enough to be misunderstood.

We do not defend the validity of seeing beauty in a natural landscape; we accept with gratitude the fact that we are so endowed as to see it that way.

The quest of the absolute leads into the four-dimensional world.

All authorities seem to be agreed that at, or nearly at, the root of everything in the physical world lies the mystic formula qp-pq=ih/2pi. We do not yet understand that; probably if we could understand it we should not think it so fundamental.

Not only is the universe stranger than we imagine, it is stranger than we can imagine.

The mathematics is not there till we put it there.