// Philosophy Department at St. Anselm College //

The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man.

For the world is a sum of appearances; and there must therefore be some transcendental ground of the appearances, that is, a ground which is thinkable only by the pure understanding.

(Critique of Pure Reason)

All life operates through a mechanism, and the higher the form of life the more complex, sure and flexible the mechanism. This fact alone should save us from opposing life and mechanism, thereby reducing the latter to unintelligent automatism and the former to aimless splurge.

— John Dewey

(Human Nature and Conduct)

Maturity is a bitter disappointment for which no remedy exists, unless laughter can be said to remedy anything.

(Cat's Cradle)

Philosophy can be said to consist of three activities: to see the commonsense answer, to get yourself so deeply into the problem that the commonsense answer is unbearable, and to get from that situation back to the commonsense answer.

Ludwig Wittgenstein

God is even in these stones.

The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts.

Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge: it is those who know little, and not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science.

If the human mind was simple enough to understand, we'd be too simple to understand it.

Some men see things as they are and ask why. Others dream things that never were and ask why not.